Revolutionary Russia

Wherever modern European history is taught, the Russian revolutions of 1905 and 1917 are central to its concerns. These events marked a crucial turning point in the demise of autocracy and the rise of revolutionary socialism that would shape Russia, Europe and the international system for the rest of the twentieth century and beyond. Launched in 1988, and supported by a prestigious Editorial Board, Revolutionary Russia is the only English-language journal to concentrate on the revolutionary period of Russian history, from c.1880-c.1932. As the journal of the Study Group on the Russian Revolution (founded in 1975), it is interdisciplinary and international in approach, publishing original research, documentary sources, book reviews and review articles in the fields of history, politics, economics, sociology, art history and literary and intellectual history from scholars across the world, including Russia and other countries of the former Soviet Union. Submissions to the editor are welcome from established, young, and independent scholars.

Two issues per year.

Publisher: 
Routledge
ISSN (print): 
09546445
ISSN (online): 
17437873

Latest articles

Volume 26 (2)

Editorial Board
vol. 26 (2): 0-0
WEATHERING THE REVOLUTION: PATRONAGE AS A STRATEGY OF SURVIVAL
vol. 26 (2): 97-127
‘THE STRUGGLE AGAINST DENATIONALISATION’: THE RUSSIAN EMIGRATION IN EUROPE AND EDUCATION IN THE 1920S
vol. 26 (2): 128-146
AN OUTSIDER LOOKS IN: WALTER CITRINE'S FIRST VISIT TO THE SOVIET UNION, 1925
vol. 26 (2): 147-163
The Fall of Tsarism: Untold Stories of the February 1917 Revolution
vol. 26 (2): 164-169
Selling to the Masses: Retailing in Russia, 1880–1930
vol. 26 (2): 170-172
Leon Trotsky: A Revolutionary's Life
vol. 26 (2): 172-173
Lenin's Terror: The Ideological Origins of Early Soviet State Violence
vol. 26 (2): 174-175
Räume des Schreckens. Gewalt und Gruppenmilitanz in der Ukraine 1905–1933
vol. 26 (2): 175-177
Russian Jews Between the Reds and the Whites, 1917–1920
vol. 26 (2): 178-179
Former People: The Final Days of the Russian Aristocracy
vol. 26 (2): 180-181
The ‘Change of Signposts’ in the Ukrainian Emigration: A Contribution to the History of Sovietophilism in the 1920s
vol. 26 (2): 181-183
Showcasing the Great Experiment: Cultural Diplomacy and Western Visitors to the Soviet Union, 1921–1941
vol. 26 (2): 184-185
Stalinist Society, 1928-1953
vol. 26 (2): 185-187
Moscow, the Fourth Rome: Stalinism, Cosmopolitanism, and the Evolution of Soviet Culture, 1931–1941
vol. 26 (2): 187-188
RUSSIAN PUBLICATIONS 2013
vol. 26 (2): 189-202
NOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS
vol. 26 (2): 203-0

Volume 26 (1)

Collegiality in the People’s Commissariats, 1917-1920
vol. 26 (1): 1-31
Georgii Plekhanov and the Communist Manifesto: the Proletarian Revolution Revisited
vol. 26 (1): 32-51
Alexander Bogdanov’s Conception of Proletarian Culture
vol. 26 (1): 52-70