The Journal of Legal History

The Journal of Legal History, founded in 1980, is the only British journal concerned solely with legal history. It publishes articles in English on the sources and development of the common law, both in the British Isles and overseas, on the history of the laws of Ireland, Scotland, and Wales, and on Roman Law and the European legal tradition. There is a section for shorter research notes, review-articles, and a wide-ranging section of reviews of recent literature.

3 issues a year.

Publisher: 
Routledge
ISSN (print): 
01440365
ISSN (online): 
17440564

Latest articles

Volume 39 (3)

Changes to Common Law Printing in the 1630s: Unlawful, Unreliable, Dishonest?
vol. 39 (3): 225-252
Felony Forfeiture at the Manor of Worfield, C.1370–C.1600
vol. 39 (3): 253-277
Thirteenth-Century Origins of Punitive or Exemplary Damages: The Statute of Westminster I (1275) and Roman Law
vol. 39 (3): 278-306
The Contribution of Contemporary Mathematics to Contractual Fairness in Equity, 1751–1867
vol. 39 (3): 307-339
A History of Australian Tort Law 1901–1945: England’s Obedient Servant?
vol. 39 (3): 340-342
Strange Bedfellows: Marriage in the Age of Women’s Liberation
vol. 39 (3): 343-345

Volume 39 (2)

‘The Right to Shoot Himself’: Secession in the British Commonwealth of Nations
vol. 39 (2): 117-139
Judging a Judge: A Reappraisal of Lord Mansfield and Somerset’s Case
vol. 39 (2): 140-156
The Failure of the First Income Tax: A Tale of Commercial Tax Evaders?
vol. 39 (2): 157-186
Constitutional Rights in the Irish Home Rule Bill of 1893
vol. 39 (2): 187-215
Lawyers' Empire, Legal Professions and Cultural Authority, 1780-1950
vol. 39 (2): 216-219
Law in Theory and History: New Essays on a Neglected Dialogue
vol. 39 (2): 219-221
Constitution-making in Asia: Decolonisation and State-building in the Aftermath of the British Empire
vol. 39 (2): 221-223

Volume 38 (3)

Editorial Board
vol. 38 (3): 0-0
Editorial Board
vol. 38 (3): 0-0
The ‘illegal sentences which magistrates were daily passing’: The Backstory to Governor Richard Bourke's 1832 Punishment and Summary Jurisdiction Act in Convict New South Wales
vol. 38 (3): 231-253
The ‘illegal sentences which magistrates were daily passing’: The Backstory to Governor Richard Bourke's 1832 Punishment and Summary Jurisdiction Act in Convict New South Wales
vol. 38 (3): 231-253
The Origins of Trade Secrecy Law in England, 1600–1851
vol. 38 (3): 254-281
The Origins of Trade Secrecy Law in England, 1600–1851
vol. 38 (3): 254-281
Bentham on the Interpretation of Laws
vol. 38 (3): 282-307